Talking Tereré on NPR – Hablando Sobre el Tereré en NPR

[haiku url=”http://discoveringparaguay.com/home/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/YerbaMateInterview-GoodFood.mp3″ title=”Yerba Mate Interview with Evan Kleiman of KCRW’s Good Food”]

[column width=”47%” padding=”6%”]

This week I was on the KCRW (Santa Monica, CA´s NPR station) radio show “Good Food” talking with host Evan Kleiman about how yerba mate is consumed in Paraguay.  The conversation mostly focused on tereré but we talked about some yerba basics as well.  Click on the player above to hear the interview or scroll to the bottom of the post to hear the full show. For those of you who´d rather read than listen I’ve transcribed the interview below. If you want to learn more about other ways Paraguayans consume mate, as well as other specialties of Paraguayan cuisine, then check out my 2009 interview on “Good Food.”

[/column] [column width=”47%” padding=”0%”]

Esta semana me entrevisté con Evan Kleiman del programa “Good Food” (Comida Buena) que se transmite el la estación KCRW, estación de Radio Nacional Pública estadounidense en Santa Monica, California. La entrevista fue acerca de la forma en la cual se consume yerba en el Paraguay – nos enfocamos más en el tereré pero también hablé sobre la yerba en general. Puedes oir la entrevista haciendo click al reproductor de arriba o, si quieres oir el programa entero, en el reproductor al final de este artículo. Si quieres aprender sobre las otras formas de consumir yerba en el Paraguay, o sobre otros platos típicos del Paraguay puedes escuchar la entrevista que hice con “Good Food” en el 2009.

[/column]
[end_columns]

A hollowed cow horn for drinking tereré - un cuerno de vaca para tomar el tereré

Tereré is typically drunk out of a hollowed out bull horn - El tereré típicamente se toma de un cuerno de vaca

[column width=”47%” padding=”6%”]

Evan Kleiman: Ground leaves sit in a gourd waiting for water to create a drink that powers much of Paraguay, Uruguay, Argentina and Chile. Yerba mate is starting to make inroads here in the U.S. as consumers embrace it´s incredibly clean buzz. Natalia Goldberg lives in Paraguay where she writes for the online travel guide Discovering Paraguay. She joins us for a look at this popular South American drink.

[/column] [column width=”47%” padding=”0%”]

Evan Kleiman: Hojas molidas reposan en una guampa aguardando que se les agregue agua para crear una bebida que provee energía a muchos del Paraguay, Uruguay, Argentina y Chile. Yerba mate comienza a ganar fama en los EEUU ya que a los consumidores les gusta la energía que provee. Natalia Goldberg vive en el Paraguay donde escribe la guía online Descubriendo Paraguay. Está con nosotros para hablar de esta bebida popular sudamericana.

[/column]
[end_columns]

[column width=”47%” padding=”6%”]

Natalia: Yerba mate is, it´s actually a part of a bush and its harvested the way, a similar way that tea is harvested, so the leaves are harvested and then their dried and roasted and then ground up and that is sold as a loose tea. And that is consumed in Argentina, Uruguay, some parts of Brazil, and in Paraguay mostly in hot form as mate caliente and also as a type of chai like tea called cocido and in Paraguay in particular it is consumed cold as terere´.

[/column] [column width=”47%” padding=”0%”]

Natalia: La yerba mate es parte de un arbusto y se cosecha de similar manera al té. Las hojas se cosechan y se secan, luego se tuestan y se muelen y eso se vende como un té suelto. Se consume en Argentina, Uruguay, algunas partes de Brazil, y en el Paraguay, más que nada en forma de mate caliente y un tipo de té como el chai llamado cocido. En particular en Paraguay se consume frío en forma de tereré.

[/column]
[end_columns]

Bombilla strainers to drink tereré or mate - Bombillas para tomar tereré o mate

Bombilla strainers to drink tereré or mate - Bombillas para tomar tereré o mate

[column width=”47%” padding=”6%”]

Natalia: Tereré is a Paraguayan way of consuming yerba. As I said it is a very hot country, tropical and subtropical. So people drink hot mate like they do in other countries in the mornings when it’s cool but when it’s getting around 100 degrees, 100 plus and 100 percent humidity you want something to cool you down and so tereré is a way to do that. It functions similarly to the way you would drink hot mate in that you have your recipient, your gourd or for tereré it´s usually a hollowed out bull horn. You pour the loose tea into this cup or gourd directly and then you pour the ice water over it and you strain it through a metal straw called a bombilla that has a strainer at the bottom of it. And often people will add medicinal herbs into their ice water so it´s almost like you´re getting an infusion along with your tereré.

[/column] [column width=”47%” padding=”0%”]

Natalia: El tereré es una manera paraguaya de consumir la yerba. Como mencioné es un país muy caluroso, tropical y subtropical. La gente acostumbra tomar mate como lo hacen en otros países por la mañana cuando está fresco el tiempo, pero cuando va subiendo a 40 grados con 100 porciento de humedad uno quiere algo para refrescarse y el tereré es una forma de lograrlo. Funciona similar al mate en cuanto a que uno tiene el recipiente, tu guampa, o para el tereré más se usa un cuerno de vaca o toro hueco. Allí se mete la yerba suelta y encima se le vierte el agua helado y se filtra a través de una especie de pajita de metal llamado una bombilla, el cual tiene un colador en la punta. Muchos acostumbran añadirle plantas medicinales al agua helada así uno termina agregándole una infusión al tereré.

[/column]
[end_columns]

Yuyos (medicinal plants) for tereré and mate, Paraguay - Yuyos para tereré y mate, Paraguay

A wide variety of yuyos (medicinal plants) to mash into tereré or mate water - Una gran variedad de yuyos listos para agregar al agua de tereré o mate

[column width=”47%” padding=”6%”]

Evan: what medicinal herbs are typically added in the tereré?

Natalia: Well, there´s a number of herbs, some that as Americans we´re familiar with would be mint, thyme, lemongrass, lemon verbena, sage, fennel, and then there are a lot of local plants that I had never seen before. When you see the array that the yuyeras, which is the name for the medicinal herb vendors, when you see the array that they have spread out it looks like they’ve just been foraging in the woods because people use all sorts of different parts of the plant from the roots the leaves to the stems, and so it´s definitely a very wide variety.

People will use them as flavoring agents but also for medicinal purposes, so if you have high blood pressure, or back pain or maybe if you’re tired or even hung over you can ask the vendor, the yuyera to make a suggestion, and she´ll choose usually up to three yuyos or medicinal herbs and she’ll mash them for you with a mortar and pestle. And then give them to you to put into your tereré or mate water.

[/column] [column width=”47%” padding=”0%”]

Evan: ¿Qué plantas medicinales se le agrega típicamente al tereré?

Natalia: Bueno, hay unas cuantas plantas, algunos que los americanos conocen serían la menta, el tomillo, la santa lucía, el cedrón, la salvia, el hinojo, y después hay muchas plantas locales que yo nunca había visto antes. Cuando ves el despliegue de plantas medicinales que tienen las yuyeras, eso es el nombre que se le da a las vendedoras de yuyos (plantas medicinales), parecería que recién volvieron de forrajear en el bosque porque la gente usa todas las diferentes partes de las plantas, desde la raíz hasta las hojas y los tallos. En definitiva hay una variedad muy grande.

La gente los usa para dar sabor al agua pero también para usos medicinales. Si tienes presión alta, o dolor de espalda o quizás estés cansado o hasta si tienes resaca puedes pedirle a la vendedora, la yuyera, que te haga una sugerencia. Ella escogerá hasta tres yuyos o plantas medicinales, los machacará en un mortero y te los dará para agregar al agua de tu tereré o mate.

[/column]
[end_columns]

A yuyo vendor macerates medicinal herbs for tereré and mate in Asunción, Paraguay - Un vendedor de yuyos machaca yuyos para tereré y mate en Asunción, Paraguay

A yuyo vendor macerates medicinal herbs for tereré and mate in Asunción, Paraguay - Un vendedor de yuyos machaca yuyos para tereré y mate en Asunción, Paraguay

[column width=”47%” padding=”6%”]

Evan: If you’re walking through the town and you’re half way through the day and you want to get a cup of mate do you go to a special kind of beverage place or do you go to a coffee bar that also serves mate?

Natalia: Well, nowadays you can sort of do a little of both. It’s becoming more fashionable for coffeehouses to offer mate and tereré services but most of the country will either consume mate or tereré in their homes or they’ll also go out to any number of plazas or in front of businesses like supermarkets and banks there´s usually somebody set up who has all the equipment necessary for you to rent to have a tereré or mate session in the shade of a tree, in a plaza, and they have everything set up, they have all the medicinal herbs you could add to your water, they have the yerba for you to use, they rent you the guampa which is the gourd or the recipient you pour the water into. They also rent you if you’re drinking hot mate they rent you the termos with hot water and if youre drinking cold tereré they’ll rent you the thermos with cold water and a big chunk of ice in it.

[/column] [column width=”47%” padding=”0%”]

Evan: Si estás caminando por el pueblo al medio día y quieres tomar mate vas a algún lugar especial o a un café que también sirve mate?

Natalia: Bueno, hoy en día puedes hacer los dos. Se está poniendo de moda que los cafés (confiterías) ofrezcan servicio de mate y tereré, pero la mayoría del país consume su tereré o mate en su casa o también van a sitios como plazas, o en frente a supermercados y bancos, donde las yuyeras tienen sus puestos con todo el equipo necesario para alquilar y tener una sesión de mate o tereré bajo la sombra de un árbol. Tienen todo, los yuyos que puedes agregar al agua, tiene la yerba, y te alquilan la guampa (el recipiente). También te alquilan un termo con agua caliente para mate o una jara de agua fría con un trozo grande de hielo para el tereré.

[/column]
[end_columns]

Water with yuyos ready for tereré - Agua con yuyos listo para el tereré

A thermos full of water with yuyos, ready for tereré - Un termo con agua y yuyos, listo para el tereré

[column width=”47%” padding=”6%”]

Evan: It´s so interesting that you´re using the word “rent” and “session.” So is this something like akin to like when we drink beer when everybody sits around and takes more than five minutes like you would for a cup of coffee and you’re really just sitting enjoying your tea?

Natalia: Mate and tereré they’re both very social occasions that people partake in. Some people drink along but most people get together with their friends, their coworkers, this is something that is socially acceptable to do at all levels of society in businesses in the government people take tereré breaks regularly throughout the day. It’s so hot here it´s a built in way to deal with the heat but it also has that social aspect.

[/column] [column width=”47%” padding=”0%”]

Evan: Es tan interesante que usas la palabra “alquilar” y “sesion.” ¿Así que esto es similar a cuando tomamos unas cervezas y todos se sientan y toman más que cinco minutos (como lo harías al tomarte una taza de café) y de veras se disfruta el té?

Natalia: Mate y tereré, los dos son ocasiones muy sociales en las cuales la gente participa. Algunos toman solos pero la mayoría se reúne con amigos, compañeros de trabajo, esto es algo que es aceptable en todos los niveles de la sociedad, en negocios y el gobierno, la gente toma el tereré de manera regular durante todo el día. Hace tanto calor aquí que es una manera de lidiar con el calor, pero también cumple su función social.

[/column]
[end_columns]

A variety of paraguayan yerba mate brands - una variedad de marcas de yerba mate paraguayas

A variety of Paraguayan yerba mate brands - una variedad de marcas de yerba mate paraguayas

[column width=”47%” padding=”6%”]

Evan: Describe what the taste of yerba is for people who´ve never had it before.

Natalia: I would say it is definitely a little earthy but more on the astringent and bitter side, especially some of the more popular brands coming out of Argentina and Paraguay tend to be very strong and very bitter but the nice thing is that you can get yerba that is mixed with dried herbs already such as combinations like mint and lemon and those tend to be more mellow but it is an acquired taste.

[/column] [column width=”47%” padding=”0%”]

Evan: Describe el sabor de la yerba para los que no lo conocen.

Natalia: Yo diría que tiene un leve sabor terroso pero más que nada astringente y amargo, especialmente algunas de las marcas más populares de Argentina y el Paraguay que tienden a ser muy fuertes y amargos. Pero lo bueno es que se puede conseguir yerba que viene mesclada con hierbas como menta y limón y esos tienden a tener un sabor más suave. Pero igual, es un gusto adquirido.

[/column]
[end_columns]
[column width=”47%” padding=”6%”]

Evan: That was Natalia Goldberg. She´s been blogging about Paraguay on discoveringparaguay.com and she recently published the Other Places Travel Guidebook to Paraguay.

[/column] [column width=”47%” padding=”0%”]

Evan: Nos habló Natalia Goldberg. Ella ha estado escribiendo sobre el Paraguay en DiscoveringParaguay.com y recién publicó la guía turística Paraguay (Other Places Travel Guide).

[/column]
[end_columns]

Ordering information for Paraguay travel guide
Posted in Media - Medios, Tereré Tagged with: , ,
5 comments on “Talking Tereré on NPR – Hablando Sobre el Tereré en NPR
  1. DD says:

    Congrats! Loved this. We just came back to USA (we were 3 yrs and Paraguay) and we are often walking around with our terere thermo. We get lots of curiosity and compliments. 🙂

  2. Sara & Art says:

    Great interview!

  3. paraguay says:

    In case there were any doubts about Paraguayans´ fascination with tereré here is a gallery with over 1,000 tereré related photos submitted by Paraguayan readers of Última Hora newspaper. http://www.terere.ultimahora.com/

  4. Carole says:

    I enjoyed your interview, and I enjoyed drinking tereré and mate in Paraguay when I was in the Peace Corps.

  5. G says:

    me ha encantado realmente toda esta informacion, de verdad que me has ayudado con algunas dudas que tenia desde hace un tiempo

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

Buy the 2nd edition on Amazon

Buy "Paraguay" guidebook from Amazon.com - Comprar "Paraguay" de Amazon.com